Fifty-five Questions

mother and daughter on grass
Photo by Daria Obymaha on Pexels.com

A kids’ show in the U.K. (Daisy and Ollie) did a survey of parents with preschoolers focusing on questions kids ask. Even though I’m writing this in the U.S.A. and not the U.K., I don’t think the results would be much different.

They determined that preschoolers ask their parents an average of 55 questions a day. That would be 2,310 questions over a six-week summer break. That’s a lot of questions especially when considering that many of those questions are repeats. Some of the questions are simple: Why do I need to eat vegetables? But others are deep questions people have been asking for ages: How many stars are in the sky? Why do we dream?

Not surprisingly, the #1 questions is simply “Why?” Sixty-four percent of kids ask that. Second is: “Are we there yet?” (55%)

Other top 20 questions include:

Where do babies come from? (36%)

What happens when you die? (22%)

Why is the sky blue? (28%)

Other findings show that 9 in ten parents lie to their kids about the answers, with the average parents lying 11 times over the six-week summer break.

Peter writes: But in your hearts honor Christ the Lord as holy, always being prepared to make a defense to anyone who asks you for a reason for the hope that is in you; yet do it with gentleness and respect. (1 Peter 3:15)

Often we think of those verses applying to that friend we meet with at the coffee shop or our neighbor or the visitor to our Bible study.

But how about our kids? Not all of the questions listed have spiritual connotations, but many do. Giving our kids solid, truthful answers will not only provide the correct information, but will encourage them to come back to us with even bigger questions in the future. (If we don’t answer their questions when they’re kids or if we lie about the answers, they won’t be asking us questions when they’re teens.)

Still, it’s all right to say:

*That takes more time to answer than I have right now, but we’ll talk about it later (and then DO so).

*That’s a hard one. Let’s do some research together.

*Here’s part of an answer for now. When you’re older and can understand, I’ll explain a little more.

*You asked that question 30 seconds ago. What do YOU think the answer is?

*Let me show you from the Bible so you can read what the Lord says about that.

We need to treat our kids with love, patience, gentleness and respect. Yes, 2,310 questions are a lot. But our openness, our truthfulness, our kindness will go a long way toward great communication with our children.

 

 

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